Tuesday July 19, 2011

 

Regional News

A Banner Year

BC Transit puts up big ridership numbers

Released by Joanna Linsangan, BC Transit

 

C Transit released its 2010/11 annual report, marking yet another record-breaking year. Ridership increased 5% from the previous year to 51.2 million trips throughout the province.

 

A number of communities experienced significant growth in ridership, including Fort St. John (26%), Whistler (19%), Comox Valley (17%), Prince George (16%), Central Fraser Valley (12%), Squamish (10%), Kelowna (9%), and Kamloops (8%).

"BC Transitís continued focus on delivering efficient transit to the communities we serve resulted in operating costs that were 8 to 11 percent lower and ridership per hour that was 5 to 9 percent higher than the average of similar-sized systems across the country," said Kevin Mahoney, Chair of the BC Transit Board of Directors. "That is something we and our municipal partners can all be very proud of."

Last year, BC Transit celebrated a number of milestones, including the 40th anniversaries of service in Kamloops and Port Alberni, and the 30th anniversaries for Chilliwack, Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, Terrace Regional, Kamloops handyDART, Kelowna Regional handyDART and Prince George handyDART.

In addition to long-service milestones, 2010/11 saw BC Transit launch Transit Future plans in a number of communities, introduce the first phase of RapidBus service in Kelowna, and expand Google Transit online trip planning to the Victoria system.

As of March 31, 2011, BC Transit served over 1.5 million British Columbians. With 1,028 vehicles, BC Transit has the 17th largest fleet in North America. The cost to provide service across 81 systems in British Columbia last year was $249,443,000.

To view the 2010/11 annual report and learn more about BC Transit, www.bctransit.com .

 

BACKGROUNDER

BC Transit oversees 81 different transit systems in over 50 communities. The Victoria Regional Transit System represents half of the total service population BC Transit serves, while all other communities combined, known as Regional Transit Systems, make up the other half.

After Victoria, the next largest transit systems are located in Kelowna, Kamloops, Whistler, Nanaimo, Central Fraser Valley (Abbotsford and Mission), and Prince George.

2010/11 ANNUAL REPORT HIGHLIGHTS

Victoria Regional Transit System

Ridership: 25.25M (up 1.6%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $99.6M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($34.8M or 34.9 percent), provincial funding ($34.4M or 34.5 percent), property taxes ($18.5M or 18.5 percent), fuel tax ($11.4M or 11.5 percent), and bus advertising ($0.5M or 0.6 percent).

Highlights: The Victoria Regional Transit System has consistently performed well compared to similar-sized conventional systems across the country. The Victoria system carries more passengers per capita (46 percent above the national average), more passengers per hour (9 percent above the national average), and is more cost-efficient to run (8 percent lower than the national average), according to the latest Canadian Urban Transit Association report.

 

Regional Transit Systems

Ridership: 25.95M (up 8.6%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $133.7M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($29.45M or 22.0 percent), provincial funding ($64.23M or 48.0 percent), property taxes ($39.7M or 29.7 percent), and bus advertising ($0.34M or 0.3 percent).

 

Kelowna Regional Transit System

Ridership: 4,763,139 (up 9.6%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $19.26M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($4.98M or 25.9 percent), provincial funding ($8.99M or 46.7 percent), property taxes ($5.2M or 27.0 percent), and bus advertising ($0.09M or 0.4 percent).

 

Kamloops Transit System

Ridership: 3,469,666 (up 8.2%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $10.73M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($3.41M or 31.8 percent), provincial funding ($5.01M or 46.7 percent), property taxes ($2.28M or 21.2 percent), and bus advertising ($0.03M or 0.3 percent).

 

Whistler Transit System

Ridership: 3,106,000 (up 19.1%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $12.71M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($3.10M or 24.4 percent), provincial funding ($5.94M or 46.7 percent), and property taxes ($3.67M or 28.9 percent).

 

Nanaimo Regional Transit System

Ridership: 2,615,387 (up 6.4%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $12.36M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($3.62M or 29.3 percent), provincial funding ($4.57M or 37.0 percent), property taxes ($4.12M or 33.3 percent), and bus advertising ($0.05M or 0.4 percent).

 

Central Fraser Valley Transit System (Abbotsford and Mission)

Ridership: 2,341,596 (up 13%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $9.7M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($2.55M or 26.3 percent), provincial funding ($4.50M or 46.4 percent), property taxes ($2.61M or 26.9 percent), and bus advertising ($0.04M or 0.4 percent).

 

Prince George Transit System

Ridership: 1,943,921 (up 16.8%)

Costs & Funding: The total cost to run the service last fiscal was $6.73 M. Funding for the system came from transit fares ($1.84M or 27.3 percent), provincial funding ($3.19M or 47.4 percent), property taxes ($1.69M or 25.1 percent), and bus advertising ($0.01M or 0.15 percent).

1 Costs reflect additional municipal costs incurred by municipally-run transit system and not included in Annual Operating Agreement.

FUNDING

Providing local transit service is made possible through a partnership with local governments and the Province of British Columbia through BC Transit.

Funding sources include customer fares, property taxes, fuel tax and advertising.

Total provincial contributions, which include operating and amortization of deferred capital grants, have increased from $93,129,000 to $114,100,000.

The respective local government agencies contributed $66,793,000, up from $60,840,000 in the previous year (combined with fuel tax).

Revenue from customer fares, advertising and investments increased from $64,884,000 to $68,531,000.

ABOUT BC TRANSIT

BC Transit is the provincial Crown agency charged with coordinating transportation systems throughout British Columbia outside of Metro Vancouver.

The corporation is governed by a seven-member Board of Directors appointed by the Province according to criteria specified in the British Columbia Transit Act. The Board of Directors, through the Chair, reports to the Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure (designated as the Minister responsible for BC Transit).

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