Friday April 13, 2012

RCMP News

Seconds Count

Mounties ask residents to ensure house address numbers are visible

Released by Cst. Kate Link, Chwk RCMP UFVRD/Handout

 

an we find you in an emergency? That is the question house and business owners need to ask themselves.

 

In an emergency seconds count. Police, fire, and ambulance depend on house numbers to find you as quickly as possible.

 

Finding your home, especially at night, can be challenging if your address numbers are unreadable, hidden, unlighted or have missing numbers. These things may delay emergency
responders from getting to you as quickly as possible.

The Chilliwack Fire Prevention and Protection Bylaw states under Section 22 that, the address of each building must appear on the side facing the street so as to be clearly visible and legible from the street. Numbers shall be at least 25.5 centimeters in height, 1 centimeter in width, and be of a color that contrasts with the background on which they are mounted. Failure to provide a visible and legible address on a building under Section 22 will result in a $500.00 fine. This refers to commercial buildings only, not residential properties.

The Chilliwack Fire Depart recommends that the address of each building must appear on the side facing the street so as to be clearly visible and legible from the street. Numbers shall be a be a minimum of 4" (10 cms) in height and be of a colour that contrasts with the background on
which they are mounted. These numbers can be purchased at various department or home improvement stores.

What you should look for in determining if your address is clearly visible from the street:


1. Are the house numbers set on a background of contrasting color?
2. If your house is hidden from the street, are your numbers attached to a visible fence,

mailbox or gate?
3. If you live in a mobile home, is your mobile home identified with your house number?
4. Is your house on a corner? When you live on a corner your house number should face the street named in your address.

"If you said no to any of these questions, you may want to look at visiting one of the local hardware stores to purchase new numbers, they come as cheap as a couple dollars per number," said Constable Kate Link of the Chilliwack RCMP General Duty Section. "Protect yourself and your loved ones and make sure your house numbers are visible."
 

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